Luxembourg

Luxembourg

Luxembourg is a constitutional monarchy (Grand Duchy) in Western Europe. Luxembourg is a small inland state bordering Belgium in the west and north, Germany in the east and France in the south. There are two main regions, Ösling in the north and Gutland in the south. The capital is Luxembourg. Luxembourg is slightly larger than Vestfold county, has 556,319 inhabitants per 2014 and is one of the smallest nations in…

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Luxembourg Overview

Luxembourg flag

Luxembourg is a Grand Duchy located at the intersection of Belgium, Germany and France. The country is one of the six original members of the EEC (later the EC and the EU). Luxembourg is one of Europe’s microstates. Capital: Luxembourg Biggest city: Luxembourg State: Grand Duchy of the EU Language: German, French, Luxembourgish Religion: catholicism Surface: 2,586 km Population: 514,900 (2013) Population density: 190 residents per km² Life expectancy: 79…

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Luxembourg Knowledge and Culture

Music in Luxembourg

It is compulsory and free schooling for children from six to 15 years. The elementary school is six years old. When the children are twelve years old, they must choose between continuing in secondary school or taking a technical and vocational education. The University of Luxembourg is the only country in the country. Many young people study abroad. Luxembourg has two large and some smaller daily newspapers. The largest are…

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Literature of Luxembourg Part IV

Enrico Pisani

Luxembourg’s literature in our time Two writers with an Italian background It is characteristic of today’s literature that many of the authors were born and raised abroad, but for various reasons they have chosen to live and work in Luxembourg. Several of the best known have an Italian background. Giulio – Enrico Pisani (born 1943) was born in Rome and lived in Switzerland and Belgium before moving to Luxembourg as…

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Luxembourg Population and Language

Luxembourg Population and Language

Half of the residents of Luxembourg are foreign nationals, the vast majority of whom come from other EU countries. Most native Luxembourgers are trilingual and speak Luxembourgish, French and German. The population has grown sharply for a long time, mainly through immigration. The number of residents has doubled since World War II. The first major immigration waves came from southern Europe, mainly Italy and Portugal. The high proportion of non-citizens…

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Literature of Luxembourg Part III

Lambert Schlechter

Postwar German-language lyricists Luxembourg has educated many lyricists, and several of them have gained recognition outside their borders. Nicholas Welter (1871–1951), a professor of literature, also wrote plays, essays and libretto for an opera. He wrote almost exclusively in German, but was also an expert on Occitan literature and, among other things, a driving force for Frédéric Mistral to receive the Nobel Prize in 1904. Welter was also a mentor…

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Literature of Luxembourg Part II

Nicolas Gredt

Luxembourg’s earliest literature Both in the Middle Ages and in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Luxembourg’s literature was dominated by humanists who wrote mainly in Latin. Literature was also written in the national languages, but this is not very extensive and not very well known today. In the 19th century, Luxembourg gradually got more writers who wrote in these languages. One of them was Félix Thyes (1830-1855), who wrote in…

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Literature of Luxembourg Part I

Anise Koltz

In Luxembourg, several languages ​​are used. The three official languages ​​are German, French and Letzeburgesch or Luxembourgish. This language, which is currently mastered by about 390,000 people, became one of the country’s official languages ​​in 1984. Some linguists believe that letzeburgesch is not a language of its own, but a variant of German. Yet it is so different from German that a foreigner who knows German will not understand letzeburgesch.…

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Geography of Luxembourg

Plant life and wildlife in Luxembourg

Luxembourg’s largest stretch east-west is just over 50 km, north-south approx. 80 km. The land is largely formed by the basin areas of the rivers Sûre and Alzette, both flowing into the Sauer, a bee to the Moselle. The northern third of the country, Ösling, is intersected by a continuation of the Belgian Ardennes, which links these with the Eifel in Germany. This meager plateau landscape of Devonian slate with…

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